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First-time buyer housing out of reach

In comparison the actual average wage is £22,000 in the UK and £28,000 in London.

KPMG has based the wage requirement on saving for a 10% deposit.

Legal & General Mortgage Club’s director Jeremy Duncombe said the results come as no surprise.

He added: “The supply of housing is not keeping pace with demand which is pushing prices up in contrast to salaries which are rising at a much slower rate.

“This imbalance means that first-time buyers will struggle to save up a big enough deposit to buy a house, a problem which is particularly acute in London.

“This is why initiatives from the government can play such a big role in helping people buy a house.

“It’s good to see that all political parties have put housebuilding at the top of the agenda in the run up to the election, but we need to ensure that they follow through on their promises if we are to restore balance to the market.”

The data also revealed that while more than two thirds (69%) of people are concerned about the state of affordable housing in the UK demand looks set to continue, as more than seven in 10 (72%) 16-17 year olds want to buy within the next 10 years.

Jan Crosby, head of housing at KPMG, said: “These figures make for frightening reading and show that housing affordability is no longer just a problem for lower wage earners.

“Now unless you earn well above average or receive an inheritance, it is unlikely you will be afford to buy, no matter where in the UK you live.

“And yet this isn’t just about home ownership, because our findings show genuine concern over wider affordability of housing, whether buying or renting.

“Being able to live in a stable home is a basic human need, tied up with important feelings of choice and certainty, and we are living in a world now where only a few can hope for that, which cannot be right.”

Easier places to buy based on the required annual wage are Northern Ireland (£21,000) and the North East of England (£24,000) – where actual salaries are closer at £19,000 and £20,000.


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