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Homeowners would like to live beside the seaside

Nia Williams

August 30, 2011

This is according to new research from property website Globrix.com which analysed property prices in the UK’s most popular seaside towns.

Globrix.com discovered average house prices were £174,177 higher in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, than the average for the East of England region as a whole and at £388,340, it is the UK’s most expensive coastal town.

Mumbles in Swansea followed closely behind commanding prices that are 75% (£128,461) higher than the average for Wales. Also in high demand is Southwold with premiums of 71% and Tenby at 70% premiums compared to other homes in the area.

For those seeking properties in seaside towns without the significant premiums, there are a number of coastal areas that offer great value for money. Plymouth takes the lead with asking prices that are 45% (£107,512) below prices for the rest of the South West region. Potential buyers may also consider Margate in Kent, where sellers can expect to pay 41% (£112,857) less than the regional average or Ramsgate where prices sit 40% below the rest of the South East region.

Jennifer Warner from Globrix.com said: “During the summer months and particularly over bank holidays, seaside towns become the UK’s destination hotspot for both British and international visitors. For many, the lifestyle that comes with living near the coast is also hugely desirable so property in these areas is in high demand. Adleburgh, famous for its blue flag shingle beach and host to the internationally renowned Adleburgh Festival of Arts is a prime example.

“But our research does however highlight that not all properties located in seaside towns come with hefty price tags, as many of the most well-known British resorts, such as Weston-Super-Mare and Blackpool are home to some excellent property bargains.

“For potential buyers with a desire to be beside the seaside, there are plenty of coastal gems to be found if they are prepared to put in the leg-work.”


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